Sean has a lucrative career as a consultant/contractor. As such, he spends a great deal of time in other people’s bases, and finds things like a method with this signature:

public boolean isTableEmpty()

Already, you’re in trouble. Methods which operate directly on “tables” are a code-smell, yes, even in a -driven application. You want to operate on business objects, and unless you’re a furniture store, tables are not business objects. You might think in those terms when building some of your lower-level components, but then you’d expect to see things like string tableName in the parameter list.

Now, maybe I’m just being opinionated. Maybe there’s a perfectly valid reason to build a method like this that I can’t imagine. Well, let’s check the
implementation.

public boolean isTableEmpty()
{
    boolean res = false;
    Connection conn = cpInstance.getConnection();
    try (PreparedStatement ps = conn.prepareStatement("select * from some_")) {
        try (ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery()) {
            if (rs.first()) {
 	        res = true;
            }
        }
    catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            conn.close();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    return res;
}

Even if you think this method should exist, it shouldn’t exist like this. No COUNT(*) or LIMIT in the query. Using exceptions as flow control. And the best part: returning the opposite of what the method name implies. false tells us the table is .

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